Calculate Your Emissions Now!



Select Your Transport Option



Calculate Your Personal Vehicle Emissions



Distance: km

Return Trip?




Your total emissions:
kg CO2


If you caught the bus your trip's emissions would be:
kg CO2.
Reducing your emissions by %!


If you caught the train your trip's emissions would be:
kg CO2.
Reducing your emissions by %!

Calculate Your Public Transport Emissions



Distance: km

Return Trip?



Total emissions: kg CO2

In a small car your trip's
emissions would be: kg CO2

Your current option produces:
% less emissions, than a personal vehicle.

Calculate Your Air Travel Emissions



Flying Time: hr(s) ( mins.)

Return Trip?


Total emissions: kg CO2.
That's the equivalent of trips between to Auckland from Wellington.



In a small car your trip's emissions would be: kg CO2.


If you took the bus your trip's emissions would be: kg CO2.
Reducing your emissions by %!


If you took the train your trip's emissions would be: kg CO2.
Reducing your emissions by %!

Calculate Your Food Emissions

By switching out for once a day, every day, you could save {{subsPerServe/1000 *365 | number:1}}kg CO2 ({{((subSelect1.carbon - subSelect.carbon)/subSelect1.carbon)*100 |number:0}}%) in one year


Item Amount g CO2/ serve
{{item.Product}} {{item.Quantity}} {{item.carbon}}

Total:
{{total/1000 | number:1}}kg CO2

This is the equivalent of
{{foodInKs | number:0}}km in a


Food Consumption

Food (Portion Sizes)

C02 Emissions (kg) per serving

Approximate Car Equivalent (Miles)

Approximate Car Equivalent (km)

Red Meat

Raw Lamb (150g)

5.88

13.65

21.97

Raw Beef (150g)

4.05

9.45

15.21

Raw Pork (150g)

1.815

4.2

6.76

Poultry

Raw Turkey (150g)

1.635

3.75

2.63

Raw Chicken (150g)

1.035

2.4

3.86

Seafood

Raw Fish (150g)

0.78

3.5

5.63

Raw Tuna (100g)

0.61

1.4

2.25

Animal Product

Cheese (40g)

0.54

1.75

2.82

Egg (1 egg / 50g)

0.24

0.55

0.89

Vegetarian Substitute

Tofu (120g)

0.24

0.54

0.87

Vegetarian Meat Substitute (100g chickpeas)

0.2

0.5

0.80

Dried Beans/Split Peas/Lentils (96g)

0.0864

0.192

0.31

Nuts/Seeds (30g)

0.069

0.06

0.09

Learn about Your Everyday Impact
on Our Environment




About

‘There is widespread global awareness of climate change… [yet] there is a generalized belief that the risks of climate change are greater to others than to oneself and that consequences will happen in the future, but not now’ (Chadwick, 2017).  

The implication of Chadwick’s (2017) findings is not so much that the population lacks information about climate change, but rather that we lack direction and meaningful tools for regulating our own self-destructive behaviour.

What’s My Impact , therefore, serves to connect the student and staff population of Victoria University of Wellington with meaningful information that helps them understand the real impact of their choices.

Developed by Alex Bremner, Leighton Szeto, Alex Taikato, and Jack Woodbury. Many thanks to Mary-Ellen Gordon and the VUW INFO 320 staff.

Infographics

  1. Uses calculations as below. Assumes driving a small car (2000-2010).
  2. Uses calculations as below. Assumes raw lamb and raw fish.
  3. Uses calculations as below. Assumes raw lamb and falafel.
  4. Uses calculations as below. Assumes driving a small car (2000-2010).
  5. Uses calculations as below. Assumes raw lamb and raw chicken.
  6. Uses calculations as below. Assumes driving a small car (2000-2010).
  7. Uses calculations as below. Assumes driving a small car (2000-2010).
  8. Uses calculations as below. Does not account for build emissions.

 

The infographics are available at the bottom of this page.

Abstractions

What’s My Impact abstracts climate change data to give users an approximate calculation of their emissions. The tool’s mission is to nudge behaviour, rather than give accurate figures.

Thus, What’s My Impact minimises both the input information required from users and the potential output information. Additionally, What’s My Impact focuses solely on CO2 emissions. This ensures ease of use and understanding for users.

Further, What’s My Impact only calculates information relating to food and transportation. Accounting for over 70% of New Zealand’s emissions, reducing CO2 from energy production (transportation) and food is of significant concern for Victoria University of Wellington students and staff (Statistics New Zealand, 2017).

Calculations

Personal Vehicles

The following table uses a wide variety of approximate data to indicate CO2 output per km.

Car Type/Year Made

<=1999

2000-2010

>=2010

Hybrid (Prius)

N/A

138g CO2/km

90g CO2/km

Small Car

190g CO2/km

155g CO2/km

123g CO2/km

Large Car

224g CO2/km

180g CO2/km

135g CO2/km

Family Car/ Minivan

265g CO2/km

248g CO2/km

225g CO2/km

SUV

258g CO2/km

241g CO2/km

212g CO2/km

Ute

264g CO2/km

248g CO2/km

217g CO2/km

Van

278g CO2/km

255g CO2/km

226g CO2/km

(Environmental Protection Agency, 2018; European Commission, n.d.; European Commission, 2009; European Commission, 2018; European Environmental Agency, 2014; Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, 2017; National Transport Commission, 2014; Vehicle Certification Agency, 2018 ).

Air Travel

Air travel emissions have been calculated per minute using Air New Zealand’s current data (2018). The Airbus A320 is used for New Zealand domestic flights and international flights to Australia and the Pacific. The Boeing 787-9 is used for long-haul international flights. What’s My Impact assumes 80% capacity to produce a more realistic figure, per passenger (Jardine, 2009).

Airbus A320 (Domestic/ International AUS/Pacific):

  • Cruising speed 853km/hr
  • 9.149kg CO2/km
  • Thus, 7,804,097g CO2/hr

 

  • 80% capacity (136) = 57,383g CO2/hr per passenger
    • Per minute = 956g CO2
    • 67g CO2/km per passenger

Boeing 787-9 (International Long-Haul):

  • Cruising speed 913km/hr
  • 18.588kg CO2/km
  • Thus, 16,971,195g CO2/hr

 

  • 80% capacity (241) = 70,419g CO2/hr per passenger
    • Per minute = 1174g CO2
    • 77g CO2/km per passenger

Public Transportation

The Greater Wellington Regional Council’s data is used to calculate approximate bus figures (2017). The European Environmental Agency is used to approximate train emissions. (2014). For buses, the tool will assume 75% capacity.

 

Bus Emissions (Wellington) (Greater Wellington Regional Council, 2017).

  • Max capacity 30g co2/km/person
  • 75% capacity 45g CO2/km/person

 

Train Emissions (European Environmental Agency, 2014).

  • 28.39g CO2/km per passenger

Food Consumption

Food (Portion Sizes)

C02 Emissions (kg) per serving

Approximate Car Equivalent (Miles)

Approximate Car Equivalent (km)

Red Meat

Raw Lamb (150g)

5.88

13.65

21.97

Raw Beef (150g)

4.05

9.45

15.21

Raw Pork (150g)

1.815

4.2

6.76

Poultry

Raw Turkey (150g)

1.635

3.75

2.63

Raw Chicken (150g)

1.035

2.4

3.86

Seafood

Raw Fish (150g)

0.78

3.5

5.63

Raw Tuna (100g)

0.61

1.4

2.25

Animal Product

Cheese (40g)

0.54

1.75

2.82

Egg (1 egg / 50g)

0.24

0.55

0.89

Vegetarian Substitute

Tofu (120g)

0.24

0.54

0.87

Vegetarian Meat Substitute (100g chickpeas)

0.2

0.5

0.80

Dried Beans/Split Peas/Lentils (96g)

0.0864

0.192

0.31

Nuts/Seeds (30g)

0.069

0.06

0.09

 

  • All food portion sizes are based off the healthy food guidelines NZ magazine (Healthy Life Media Limited, April 2013) and the eating activity guidelines for NZ adults produced by the Ministry of Health (Ministry of Health, 2015).
  • As plant-based foods output negligible carbon emissions, the chosen foods calculated below are common meat options or meat-substitutes.
  • Chickpeas are commonly used plant-based replacements for meat. These calculations will assume chickpeas are the meat substitute for any giving serving.

C02 Emissions (kg) per serving of edible product and corresponding car mileages are calculated using the table provided by from the GreenEatz website (Greeneatz, 2018), which was based off the Environmental Working Groups Meat Eaters Guide to Health and Climate (Environmental Working Group, 2011).

Carbon Emissions 100g of Chickpeas are calculated using the Carbon Footprint summary of Tesco PLC (TescoPLC, August 2012).

 

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References

Chadwick, A. E. (2017, September 18). Climate Change Communication. Retrieved September 6, 2018, from http://communication.oxfordre.com/view/10.1093/acrefore/9780190228613.001.0001/acrefore-9780190228613-e-22

 

Environmental Protection Agency. (2018). Green Vehicle Guide. Retrieved 12 August, from https://www.epa.gov/greenvehicles/greenhouse-gas-emissions-typical-passenger-vehicle

 

Environmental Working Group. (2011). Meat Eaters Guide to Health and Climate. Retrieved from:

http://static.ewg.org/reports/2011/meateaters/pdf/methodology_ewg_meat_eaters_guide_to_health_and_climate_2011.pdf

 

European Commission (n.d.).  2009 Mazda CO2 Emissions. Retrieved 15 August, from https://www.energy.eu/car-co2-emissions/mazda.php

 

European Commission (n.d.). 2009 Suzuki CO2 Emissions. Retrieved 15 August, from https://www.energy.eu/car-co2-emissions/suzuki.php

 

European Commission (2009). 2009 Toyota CO2 Emissions . Retrieved 15 August, from  https://www.energy.eu/car-co2-emissions/toyota.php

 

European Commission. (2018). CO2 Emissions from Cars: the facts. Retrieved 12 August, from https://www.transportenvironment.org/sites/te/files/publications/2018_04_CO2_emissions_cars_The_facts_report_final_0_0.pdf

 

European Environmental Agency (2014). Energy Efficiency and specific CO2 Emissions. Retrieved 20 August, from https://www.eea.europa.eu/data-and-maps/indicators/energy-efficiency-and-specific-co2-emissions/energy-efficiency-and-specific-co2-9

 

Franklin, K. (2017, August 11). Communicating Climate Change. Retrieved September 6, 2018, from https://earthobservatory.sg/blog/communicating-climate-change

 

Greater Wellington Regional Council. (2017). Evaluating Bus Emissions What colour, how big and how much is that elephant in the window? Retrieved 15 August, from  https://www.transport.govt.nz/assets/Uploads/Research/Documents/2017-Transport-Knowledge-Presentations/Evaluating-Bus-Emissions.pdf

 

Greeneatz. (2018). Food's Carbon Footprint . Retrieved from greeneatz: http://www.greeneatz.com/foods-carbon-footprint.html

 

Healthy Life Media Limited. (April, 2013). HFG Kick Start Motivator . Retrieved from: http://www.healthyfood.co.nz/sites/default/files/HFG%20Kick-start%20Motivator%20%E2%80%93%20Serving%20size%20guide.pdf

 

Hendricks, R. (2017, November 9). Communicating Climate Change: Focus on the Framing, Not Just the Facts. Retrieved September 6, 2018, from https://www.climaterealityproject.org/blog/communicating-climate-change-focus-framing-not-just-facts

 

Jardine, C. (2009). Calculating the Carbon Dioxide Emissions of Flights. Retrieved 20 August, from https://www.eci.ox.ac.uk/research/energy/downloads/jardine09-carboninflights.pdf

 

Linden, S., Leiserowitz, L., Feinberg, A., & Maibach, A. (2014). How to communicate the scientific consensus on climate change: Plain facts, pie charts or metaphors? Climatic Change, 126(1), 255-262.

 

Ministry for the Environment. (April 2018). New Zealand’s Greenhouse Gas Emissions 1990-2016 (Snapshot). Retrieved from:

https://www.mfe.govt.nz/sites/default/files/media/Climate%20Change/final_greenhouse_gas_inventory_snapshot.pdf

 

Ministry for the Environment. (April, 2018). New Zealand’s Greenhouse Gas Emissions 1990-2016 (Infographic). Retrieved from:

http://www.mfe.govt.nz/sites/default/files/media/Climate%20Change/nz_s_greenhouse_gas_emissions_infographic.pdf

 

Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment. (2017). New Zealand Energy Sector Greenhouse Gas Emissions . Retrieved 10 August, from http://www.mbie.govt.nz/info-services/sectors-industries/energy/energy-data-modelling/publications/energy-greenhouse-gas-emissions/documents-image-library/NZ%20Energy%20Greenhouse%20Gas%20Emissions.pdf

 

Ministry of Health (2015). Eating and Activity Guidelines for New Zealand Adults. Retrieved from: https://www.health.govt.nz/system/files/documents/publications/eating-activity-guideline-for-new-zealand-adults-oct15_0.pdf

 

Myers, T. A., Maibach, E., Peters, E., & Leiserowitz, A. (2015). Simple messages help set the record straight about scientific agreement on human-caused climate change: The results of two experiments. PLoS ONE, 10(3).

 

National Transport Commission. (2014). Carbon Dioxide Emissions from New Australian Vehicles 2013. Retrieved 10 August, from https://www.ntc.gov.au/Media/Reports/(6B1DD6CF-FB2C-B934-74A8-47971CB09050).pdf

 

Stats New Zealand. (2017). New Zealand's greenhouse gas emissions. Retrieved September 6, 2018, from http://archive.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/environment/environmental-reporting-series/environmental-indicators/Home/Atmosphere-and-climate/nz-greenhouse-gas-emissions.aspx

 

Summerfield, J. (n.d.). Mobile Website vs. Mobile App (Application) – Which is Best for Your Organization? Retrieved September 6, 2018, from https://www.hswsolutions.com/services/mobile-web-development/mobile-website-vs-apps/

 

TescoPLC. (2012). Product Carbon Footprint Summary. Retrieved September 6, 2018, from https://www.tescoplc.com/assets/files/cms/Tesco_Product_Carbon_Footprints_Summary(1).pdf

 

Thaler, R. (2008). Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth, and Happiness.

 

Vehicle Certification Agency. (2018). Car fuel data, CO2 and vehicle tax tools. Retrieved September 6, 2018, from http://carfueldata.dft.gov.uk/search-new-or-used-cars.aspx